Motivator
High D Personality - The Dominance Family

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Introduction:

The D family is associated with the ANGER emotion. This means everyone in the D family needs and appreciates PROBLEMS and CHALLENGES on some level. They are usually EXTROVERTED, TASK ORIENTED, and FAST MOVING. Their goal is RESULTS. The Dominant orientation is “taking.” Dominant orientations believe anything of value resides outside of the self and must be pursued and taken captive.

Strengths:

The Motivator (Front-Runner) is optimistic, forward looking, determined, bottom-line oriented, tenacious, quick, and can accomplish a lot in a little time. They initiate activity and challenge the status quo while taking risky chances. Right brained intuitive. They use well chosen words, show great congeniality when meeting people, and show high interest in others’ ideas.

Weaknesses:

They overstep authority, can be too direct, they are impatient with others, they are overly optimistic, they don’t pay enough attention to details, they exaggerate, and may take too many risks. They have little patience and are more contentious than consensus. They refuse to be pinned down and can act as an emotionally greased pig.

Romantic Relationships:

The Motivator will be attracted to passive partners they can direct and control and that can bring stabilization. They seek stable people who are less expressive and good listeners. Motivators are usually the more impatient, aggressive partners in the relationship. They can appear detached, aloof, over-emotional, and unstable as opposed to stable and rational. They will be abrupt, loud, and quick-fused. Only the strong will survive a relationship with a Motivator. As white-water Jordan River profiles they tend to seek out the Dead Sea.

Friendships:

The Motivator seeks friendships that sharpen their skills. They often have passive friends they can compete with. They speak their mind in relationships and expect them to do the same. They like emotional banter and will be highly flexible, unreliable, and less loyal. They have many friendships with shallow interfacing.

Parenthood:

Motivator parents are fun and exciting. They are poor “bad cops” and great “good cops.” The other parent will make the rules and like the children, the Motivator will break them. They are unpredictable, challenging, entertaining, and will change their mind without warning. They are complex and like change. This can create very unpredictable behaviors that become less reliable for children to depend on.

Career Paths:

Motivators like to be in charge. They seek position power, a large desk, and authoritative roles where they can be the stars of the show. They like task oriented positions with high people contact. This could include sales, leadership, motivational speaking, acting, improvisation, preachers, stand-up comedians, real estate sales, car sales, and positions with a high degree of people contacts.

Workplace Habits:

Motivator habits include being competitive, goal setting, seeking challenge and opportunity, and rocking the boat. They like non-routine work, people interaction, flexible hours, changes in scenery, and exciting assignments.

Conclusion:

The Motivator needs freedom from details, controls, supervision, and boring people. They need a forum to express ideas along with alone time that involves work. When communicating with this person, ask for their opinion, be stimulating, focus on them, and allow time for socializing.